A new take on environmental filtering and habitat matching

Patterns and drivers of environmental filtering and habitat matching are context dependent on a macroecological scale. Above: Panther Creek, Chattahoochee National Forest, Georgia. Understanding how communities are assembled is the ‘what we do’ of community ecology: we want to know which species are present and why. With this guiding our work, we wanted to understandContinue reading “A new take on environmental filtering and habitat matching”

ECR feature: Carlos Cano-Barbacil

Carlos is a PhD student at the University of Girona in Spain. He is an environmental engineer with special focus on freshwater ecology. Here, Carlos shares his recent work on the ecology and distribution of Iberian fishes. Carlos Cano-Barbacil in the canyon formed by the Riaza River (Segovia, Spain) Personal links. Personal website | TwitterContinue reading “ECR feature: Carlos Cano-Barbacil”

JBI Global Colloquium: Rethinking dispersal-related traits

Dispersal is a key process to study ecological and evolutionary aspects of biodiversity, such as species richness, geographical distribution, adaptation, and speciation. Researchers often rely on functional traits as proxies for the dispersal process, but the mechanistic link between trait and dispersal is not often clear. Furthermore, these traits vary among and within taxa andContinue reading “JBI Global Colloquium: Rethinking dispersal-related traits”

Wandering Vultures: Understanding behaviour and space-use for conservation

Vultures travel over large distances; identifying where they are most at risk is imperative to effective conservation work. Vultures are most at risk from illegal poisoning when they are foraging and feeding. Using telemetry data from tagged vultures, we identified these risky behaviours from GPS data and the spaces vultures choose to do them toContinue reading “Wandering Vultures: Understanding behaviour and space-use for conservation”

How seals made Nautilus a ‘Living Fossil’

Increasing predation pressure by pinnipeds through the late Cenozoic drove Nautilus into its present-day refuge in the deep tropical Indo-West Pacific Ocean Above: Reconstruction of the fossil Nautilus taiwanus inhabiting deeper waters of the tropical Indo-West Pacific Ocean about 20 million years ago. Illustration by Cheng-Han Sun. Predator-prey interactions are important drivers of evolution. ForContinue reading How seals made Nautilus a ‘Living Fossil’

ECR Feature: Yuting Vicky Lin on reef fish and climate change

Yuting Vicky Lin is a PhD student at the Institute of Oceanopgraphy at National Taiwan University. Her interests lie in the biodiversity and conservation of benthic reef communities. Vicky shares her recent work on forecasting the distribution of coral reef fish under a changing climate (left) Vicky, diving in Tawai. Photo credit: Guan Yen ChenContinue reading “ECR Feature: Yuting Vicky Lin on reef fish and climate change”

ECR feature: Tobi Oke on data synthesis as a diagnostic tool for capturing biodiversity problems

Tobi is a post-doctoral fellow at University of Saskatchewan and Wildlife Conservation Society, Canada. He is interested in assessing species distributions and vulnerability in relation to climate change and natural disturbance. Here, Tobi shares his perspetive on quantifying biodiversity change in relation to data gathering tools. Tobi during a fieldwork to explore how fish useContinue reading “ECR feature: Tobi Oke on data synthesis as a diagnostic tool for capturing biodiversity problems”

How landscape connectivity shapes genetic structure of alpine species over time

How did dispersal and habitat changes over 20,000 years shape the genetic structure of alpine species? We investigated by simulating the spatial dynamics of populations since the glaciation in combination with a large genomic data set on northern chamois. Above: Northern chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra) inhabit steep terrain slopes. They can escape predators in steep slopesContinue reading “How landscape connectivity shapes genetic structure of alpine species over time”

ECR Feature: Felipe Vieira de Freitas on bee diversity

Felipe is a postdoc at Washington State University. He uses phylogenetics to study the evolution of bees. Felipe shares his recent work on the origins and unusual antitropical diversity of Eucerinae bees. (left) Collecting bees in the Atacama Desert – Chile. (right) At the USDA bee lab in Utah, trying to understand the protocols forContinue reading “ECR Feature: Felipe Vieira de Freitas on bee diversity”

ECR feature: Waleska Elizangela dos Santos Barbosa

Waleska Barbosa is a PhD student at the National Institute of Amazonian Research in Manaus, Brazil. She is an ecologist interested in the evolutionary history of Amazonian birds. Here, Waleska shares her recent work on species historical demography and habitat associations along Amazonian floodplains. Waleska Barbosa on the observation tower at the Amazonian Museum (MuseuContinue reading “ECR feature: Waleska Elizangela dos Santos Barbosa”