Aridification-driven evolution: Three lineages, two data sets, one story

We tested the hypothesis that aridification of Australia during the Pleistocene promoted the isolation and divergence of three lineages of a migratory fish. We found support for this using an integrative framework of environmental and genomic modelling. Above: Golden perch, Macquaria ambigua. Photo credit: Peter Unmack. The Australian landscape has not always been so arid.Continue reading “Aridification-driven evolution: Three lineages, two data sets, one story”

Will Geogenomics change the future of Phylogeography?

Phylogeography is celebrating its 35th birthday; Geogenomics its 8th. We asked authors of papers in a recent special section of Journal of Biogeography to reflect on how these two approaches can increase our understanding of the distributions of genetic diversity. Above: Cover for the Geogenomics virtual issue . Biogeography is an integrative discipline, as isContinue reading “Will Geogenomics change the future of Phylogeography?”

Ecological traits matter

Differences in dispersal abilities and habitat specialization determine the postglacial range expansion of three high-elevation plants Above: Steep limestone cliffs in the Pre-Pyrenees, a glacial refugium for the study species. When I first visited the Pyrenees as a child from the Mediterranean lowlands, I got fascinated by the accordion-like folded landscape, the green and denseContinue reading “Ecological traits matter”

ECR feature: Leilton Willians Luna

Leilton W. Luna is a postdoc at the Pennsylvania State University. He is a biologist with a broad interest in how species adapt, diversify, and become extinct. Here, Leilton shares his recent work on birds of the Amazonian floodplains. Leilton Luna doing research or just having fun bird watching. Personal links. Twitter | Personal websiteContinue reading “ECR feature: Leilton Willians Luna”

ECR feature: Emily Booth on the evolution of Australian freshwater fishes

Emily Booth is a PhD student at the Flinders University in Australia. She is a molecular ecologist interested in understanding the effects of climate changes on the evolution of species. Here, Emily shares her recent work on the ‘genomic vulnerability’ of Australian freshwater fishes to climate change. Emily Booth during fieldwork in Australia. Personal links.Continue reading “ECR feature: Emily Booth on the evolution of Australian freshwater fishes”

ECR Feature: Raphael S. von Büren on range limits in alpine plants

Raphael S. von Büren recently completed his Masters at the University of Basel, Switzerland. He is an alpine ecologist with particular interests in the ecophysiology of plants. Raphael shares his recent work on the environmental factors influencing the range distribution of alpine plants. (left) Portrait Raphael von Büren. Photo credit: Raphael von Büren. (right) ResearchContinue reading “ECR Feature: Raphael S. von Büren on range limits in alpine plants”

Danish island biogeography

Danish islands help to disentangle how plant dispersal characteristics shape species richness patterns. Above: The Danish coastline with the island Hjelm in the background. © Anders Sanchez Barfod. Suppose you hear the names Galapagos, Hawaiian or Canary Islands. In that case, I am sure you have a picture in mind right away. These islands areContinue reading “Danish island biogeography”

ECR Feature: Nicky Lustenhouwer on niche shifts in invasive plants

Nicky Lustenhouwer is a postdoc at the University of Aberdeen. She is an evolutionary ecologist interested in range expansions and invasive organisms. Nicky shares her recent work on the relative roles of climate change tracking versus niche evolution in the spread of an invasive weed. Nicky Lustenhouwer with a particularly large individual of Dittrichia graveolensContinue reading “ECR Feature: Nicky Lustenhouwer on niche shifts in invasive plants”

A freshwater wall in the Atlantic

The central role of the Amazon River in the evolution of Western Atlantic reef fishes. Above: Amazon River mouth, where the plume of freshwater and sediment reaches the Atlantic Ocean. Photo by Coordenação-Geral de Observação da Terra/INPE. The magnitude of the Amazon River, by far the largest river of the world, can be illustrated byContinue reading “A freshwater wall in the Atlantic”

ECR Feature: Tom Radomski on the Rapoport Effect in North American salamanders

Tom Radomski is a PhD candidate at the University of Minnesota. He is a biogeographer with an interest in the range size and limits of salamanders. Tom shares his recent work on the “Rapoport Effect” in North American salamanders. Tom Radomski Personal links. Twitter. Institute. University of Minnesota. Academic life stage. PhD candidate. Major researchContinue reading “ECR Feature: Tom Radomski on the Rapoport Effect in North American salamanders”