ECR feature: Invasive mammals with Zach Carter

Zach Carter is a PhD student at the University of Auckland School of Biological Sciences, focusing on invasion biology, island ecosystems, and physical geography. He is currently studying landscape-scale eradication of invasive mammals of the New Zealand archipelago, including rats, mustelids, and the common brushtail possum. Zach shares the motivations and challenges behind his recentContinue reading “ECR feature: Invasive mammals with Zach Carter”

Why some taxa are more species-rich towards higher latitudes

How niche conservatism in colonizing and sedentary species shape a latitudinal gradient. Niche conservatism has often been used as an elegant explanation for why there are more species in the tropics—i.e. most taxa originated in the tropics, had more time to diversify therein, and tended to retain ancestral climatic affinities making range shifts out ofContinue reading “Why some taxa are more species-rich towards higher latitudes”

ECR feature: Letícia Soares on migratory birds and their pathogens

Letícia Soares is a postdoc at the Advanced Facility for Avian Research, University of Western Ontario, and is interested in disease ecology and evolution. In her recently published paper in Journal of Biogeography, Letícia studied the malarial parasites in North American migratory bird species in their Hispaniola over-wintering range. She shares her findings from herContinue reading “ECR feature: Letícia Soares on migratory birds and their pathogens”

A worldwide tour of grasses; using herbaria for ecological research

Grasses are extremely cosmopolitan in distribution and comprise one of the largest biomes on Earth. They are important carbon stores, account for large amounts of terrestrial primary productivity, are home to much of the worlds mammalian diversity and contribute to the livelihoods of an estimated one fifth of the world population. Grasslands are culturally, economicallyContinue reading “A worldwide tour of grasses; using herbaria for ecological research”

ECR feature: Bornean birds and elevational limits with Ryan C. Burner

Ryan Burner is currently a postdoc at the Norwegian University of Life Sciences. He is a community ecologist with an interest in the birds and insects harboured in tropical ecosystems. His recent work in the Journal of Biogeography has investigated the range limits of birds inhabiting Bornean mountains. Ryan shares his findings on temperature gradientsContinue reading “ECR feature: Bornean birds and elevational limits with Ryan C. Burner”

Structured Abstracts

The Journal of Biogeography uses a structured abstract. Here are a few pointers on how to write one that will delight editors, reviewers, and readers. Although less common that its counterpart the single paragraph prose-style abstract, the structured abstract has several benefits. One is that it helps readers find the key information that describes aContinue reading “Structured Abstracts”

Urban invaders

How efforts to understand diversity in urban areas could change perceptions of biodiversity in cities and increase green spaces. Studies about community assembly typically focus on local community properties along natural-rural-urban gradients and neglect regional processes. As such, it remains unclear which functional traits are filtered when going from a regional pool of potential colonistsContinue reading “Urban invaders”

ECR feature: Grasslands and functional traits with Emma Jardine

Emma Jardine is currently an environmental land management scientist at DEFRA. She is interested in the use of functional traits to understand how plants respond to the environment. Her recently published work in the Journal of Biogeogrphy considers the relationship between functional traits in grass species and environmental variables at a macroecological scale. Emma sharesContinue reading “ECR feature: Grasslands and functional traits with Emma Jardine”

ECR Feature: Kristen K. de Graauw on tree rings and historic log buildings

Kristen de Graauw is a dendroarchaeologist: that’s someone who studies the plant material in old human-made structures, such as buildings, artefacts and furniture. She is a recent PhD graduate from West Virginia University. In her recent work in the Journal of Biogeogrpahy, she describes the role of human occupation in shaping the distribution and dynamicsContinue reading “ECR Feature: Kristen K. de Graauw on tree rings and historic log buildings”

ECR feature: Plant diversification with Esther Dale

Esther Dale studies plant diversification as a postdoc at Manaaki Whenua – Landcare Research in Dunedin and the University of Otago, Department of Botany. Her recent publication in the Journal of Biogeography tests biome conservatism in Australian Acacia using species distribution modeling. Esther discusses the implications of her findings, particularly that hyper-diverse Australian Acacia providesContinue reading “ECR feature: Plant diversification with Esther Dale”