A worldwide tour of grasses; using herbaria for ecological research

Grasses are extremely cosmopolitan in distribution and comprise one of the largest biomes on Earth. They are important carbon stores, account for large amounts of terrestrial primary productivity, are home to much of the worlds mammalian diversity and contribute to the livelihoods of an estimated one fifth of the world population. Grasslands are culturally, economicallyContinue reading “A worldwide tour of grasses; using herbaria for ecological research”

ECR feature: Bornean birds and elevational limits with Ryan C. Burner

Ryan Burner is currently a postdoc at the Norwegian University of Life Sciences. He is a community ecologist with an interest in the birds and insects harboured in tropical ecosystems. His recent work in the Journal of Biogeography has investigated the range limits of birds inhabiting Bornean mountains. Ryan shares his findings on temperature gradientsContinue reading “ECR feature: Bornean birds and elevational limits with Ryan C. Burner”

Structured Abstracts

The Journal of Biogeography uses a structured abstract. Here are a few pointers on how to write one that will delight editors, reviewers, and readers. Although less common that its counterpart the single paragraph prose-style abstract, the structured abstract has several benefits. One is that it helps readers find the key information that describes aContinue reading “Structured Abstracts”

Urban invaders

How efforts to understand diversity in urban areas could change perceptions of biodiversity in cities and increase green spaces. Studies about community assembly typically focus on local community properties along natural-rural-urban gradients and neglect regional processes. As such, it remains unclear which functional traits are filtered when going from a regional pool of potential colonistsContinue reading “Urban invaders”

ECR feature: Grasslands and functional traits with Emma Jardine

Emma Jardine is currently an environmental land management scientist at DEFRA. She is interested in the use of functional traits to understand how plants respond to the environment. Her recently published work in the Journal of Biogeogrphy considers the relationship between functional traits in grass species and environmental variables at a macroecological scale. Emma sharesContinue reading “ECR feature: Grasslands and functional traits with Emma Jardine”

ECR Feature: Kristen K. de Graauw on tree rings and historic log buildings

Kristen de Graauw is a dendroarchaeologist: that’s someone who studies the plant material in old human-made structures, such as buildings, artefacts and furniture. She is a recent PhD graduate from West Virginia University. In her recent work in the Journal of Biogeogrpahy, she describes the role of human occupation in shaping the distribution and dynamicsContinue reading “ECR Feature: Kristen K. de Graauw on tree rings and historic log buildings”

ECR feature: Plant diversification with Esther Dale

Esther Dale studies plant diversification as a postdoc at Manaaki Whenua – Landcare Research in Dunedin and the University of Otago, Department of Botany. Her recent publication in the Journal of Biogeography tests biome conservatism in Australian Acacia using species distribution modeling. Esther discusses the implications of her findings, particularly that hyper-diverse Australian Acacia providesContinue reading “ECR feature: Plant diversification with Esther Dale”

Mountainous Matters

Writing the perspective Why Mountains Matter for Biodiversity (Perrigo et al. 2020) was a chance for myself, along with Carina Hoorn and Alexandre Antonelli, to explore and distill some of the ideas that came up while editing a book that was published two years ago: Mountains, Climate and Biodiversity (Hoorn et al., 2018). One of many early versions ofContinue reading “Mountainous Matters”

ECR feature: Tropical entomology with Friederike Gebert

Friederike Gebert is a postdoc working in tropical entomology at the University of Würzberg. Her recent work, published in the Journal of Biogeography, focuses on understanding the patterns and drivers of dung beetle distribution along an elevational gradient on Mt. Kilimanjaro. From the collection of dung beetles to the measurement of mammal dung resources, FriederikeContinue reading “ECR feature: Tropical entomology with Friederike Gebert”

Flying foxes – out of Wallacea

How efforts to understand origins and diversity led to efforts to conserve and protect the world’s largest bats ————————COVER STORY 47(2):Tsang, SM, Wiantoro, S, Veluz, MJ, et al. (2020) Dispersal out of Wallacea spurs diversification of Pteropus flying foxes, the world’s largest bats (Mammalia: Chiroptera). J. Biogeography 47(2): 527– 537. https://doi.org/10.1111/jbi.13750———————— Long-distance dispersal (LDD) is often regarded as aContinue reading “Flying foxes – out of Wallacea”