Journal of Biogeography blog

The future of biogeography, now

The Journal of Biogeography publishes research at the intersection of biology and geography that is scientifically important and of broad general interest. We seek papers describing patterns and revealing mechanisms that shape biodiversity, through time, throughout the planet, from the deep past into the future, and from local to global scales.

Featured researchers

Meet researchers publishing in the journal, emphasizing early career researchers breaking new ground

View all posts in category … https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/category/featured-researchers/

… or read goals & how to contribute: https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/2019/12/24/introducing-featured-researchers/

Highlighted papers

Read about recent biogeography research published in the journal from a different perspective

View all posts in category … https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/category/highlighted-papers/

… or read goals & how to contribute: https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/2019/01/24/introducing-highlighted-papers/

Journal news

Updates from the senior editorial team on changes and initiatives at the Journal of Biogeography

View all posts in category … https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/category/journal-news/

… or read goals & how to contribute: https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/2019/12/24/introducing-journal-news/

ECR Feature: Nicky Lustenhouwer on niche shifts in invasive plants

Nicky Lustenhouwer is a postdoc at the University of Aberdeen. She is an evolutionary ecologist interested in range expansions and invasive organisms. Nicky shares her recent work on the relative roles of climate change tracking versus niche evolution in the spread of an invasive weed. Nicky Lustenhouwer with a particularly large individual of Dittrichia graveolensContinue reading “ECR Feature: Nicky Lustenhouwer on niche shifts in invasive plants”

ECR Feature: Tom Radomski on the Rapoport Effect in North American salamanders

Tom Radomski is a PhD candidate at the University of Minnesota. He is a biogeographer with an interest in the range size and limits of salamanders. Tom shares his recent work on the “Rapoport Effect” in North American salamanders. Tom Radomski Personal links. Twitter. Institute. University of Minnesota. Academic life stage. PhD candidate. Major researchContinue reading “ECR Feature: Tom Radomski on the Rapoport Effect in North American salamanders”

ECR feature: Marco Camaiti on the morphology and ecology of skink lizards

Marco Camaiti is a PhD student at the Monash University in Australia. He is a herpetologist interested in the evolution of vertebrate diversity. Here, Marco shares his recent work on limb reduction and loss in skink lizards. Marco Camaiti during fieldwork in Australia. Personal links. Twitter Institute. School of Biological Sciences, Monash University, Australia AcademicContinue reading “ECR feature: Marco Camaiti on the morphology and ecology of skink lizards”

ECR feature: Rodolfo Anderson on lizard reponses to global warming

Rodolfo Anderson has just finished his PhD at the Monash University in Australia. He is an ecophysiologist interested in understanding the factors underlying the distribution of ectotherms. Here, Rodolfo shares his recent work on geographical correlates of the vulnerability of lizards to climate change. Rodolfo at the Itatiaia National Park, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Personal links.Continue reading “ECR feature: Rodolfo Anderson on lizard reponses to global warming”

Evolution of solitary bees suggests a biogeographic history connecting open habitats in South and North America

More than 1,000 species of eucerine bees exist mainly in savannas, deserts, and other open vegetation habitats on multiple continents, but they are uncommon near the equator and very high latitudes. The historical processes that generated this modern pattern for Eucerinae (and other taxa) are still surrounded by uncertainties. Above: Representatives of each one ofContinue reading “Evolution of solitary bees suggests a biogeographic history connecting open habitats in South and North America”


Goals
  • To broaden the reach of biogeographical research
  • To enhance papers recently published in the journal
  • To communicate the journal’s choices to advance an equitable accessible quality publishing ecosystem for biogeography
Biogeography is …

“The branch of biology that deals with the geographical distribution of plants and animals. Also: the characteristics of an area or organism in this respect.”

Oxford English Dictionary

Values
About Us

This blog is maintained in support of the biogeography community by the social media and senior editors of the Journal of Biogeography

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/page/journal/13652699/homepage/editorialboard.html

Publish & Read

For information on publishing in Journal of Biogeography see https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/page/journal/13652699/homepage/forauthors.html

To browse recent articles, visit https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/13652699/0/0