Journal of Biogeography blog

The future of biogeography, now

The Journal of Biogeography publishes research at the intersection of biology and geography that is scientifically important and of broad general interest. We seek papers describing patterns and revealing mechanisms that shape biodiversity, through time, throughout the planet, from the deep past into the future, and from local to global scales.

Featured researchers

Meet researchers publishing in the journal, emphasizing early career researchers breaking new ground

View all posts in category … https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/category/featured-researchers/

… or read goals & how to contribute: https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/2019/12/24/introducing-featured-researchers/

Highlighted papers

Read about recent biogeography research published in the journal from a different perspective

View all posts in category … https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/category/highlighted-papers/

… or read goals & how to contribute: https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/2019/01/24/introducing-highlighted-papers/

Journal news

Updates from the senior editorial team on changes and initiatives at the Journal of Biogeography

View all posts in category … https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/category/journal-news/

… or read goals & how to contribute: https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/2019/12/24/introducing-journal-news/

Pool diversity shapes unique island communities

Compiling a new island dataset enables a global perspective on the unique diversity of the smallest communities. Above: A group of small islands Pianemo, Raja Ampat, Indonesia. Like many before us, we studied island systems to better understand the drivers community composition.  Photo by Sutirta Budiman on Unsplash. Island biogeography is one of the mostContinue reading “Pool diversity shapes unique island communities”

ECR Feature: Isabel Haro-Bilbao & Josh Thia on the use of genomics to identify fisheries stocks

Isabel Haro-Bilbao and Josh Thia met while completing their PhD’s at the University of Queensland, Australia. Both had interests in the ecology of marine organisms, which led them to collaborate on a project investigating genetic differentiation in the wahoo, a large, highly dispersive pelagic fish. Isabel and Josh share how they used population genomic approachesContinue reading “ECR Feature: Isabel Haro-Bilbao & Josh Thia on the use of genomics to identify fisheries stocks”

Are there general principles governing geographical range evolution?

A simple rule that unites geographical range evolution across terrestrial and marine environments. Above: Holacanthus ciliaris (left) is broadly distributed, from the state of Florida (USA) to Santa Catarina (southern Brazil), whereas Hyplopectrus providencialis is endemic to the Caribbean islands of San Andrés and Providencia. Photographs by Osmar J. Luiz.. If one were to askContinue reading “Are there general principles governing geographical range evolution?”

ECR Feature: Ruan van Mazijk on floral species-area relationships and environmental heterogeneity

Ruan van Mazijk is a Masters student at the University of Cape Town. He is broadly interested in the ecology and evolution of plants. Ruan shares his recent work on how environmental heterogeneity influences species-area relationships in floral species from the Greater Cape Floristic Region and the Southwest Australia Floristic Region. Ruan watching the sunsetContinue reading “ECR Feature: Ruan van Mazijk on floral species-area relationships and environmental heterogeneity”

ECr Feature: Leo Ohyama on species-area diversity relationships in ants

Leo Ohyama is currently working toward his PhD at the University of Florida. He is an ecologist broadly interested in processes that shape the distribution of biodiversity. Leo shares his recent work on how species divesity scales across space in ant species across the globe. Leo digging for ants in the flatwoods of Florida, USAContinue reading “ECr Feature: Leo Ohyama on species-area diversity relationships in ants”

ECR feature: Lucas Neves Perillo on megadiversity on ancient tropical mountains

Lucas Neves Perillo is a postdoc at the Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais in Brazil. He is a biologist interested in conservation and science communication. Here, Lucas shares his recent work on disentangling the effects of latitudinal and elevational gradients on bee, wasp, and ant diversity in an ancient neotropical mountain range. Lucas Neves PerilloContinue reading “ECR feature: Lucas Neves Perillo on megadiversity on ancient tropical mountains”


Goals
  • To broaden the reach of biogeographical research
  • To enhance papers recently published in the journal
  • To communicate the journal’s choices to advance an equitable accessible quality publishing ecosystem for biogeography
Biogeography is …

“The branch of biology that deals with the geographical distribution of plants and animals. Also: the characteristics of an area or organism in this respect.”

Oxford English Dictionary

Values
About Us

This blog is maintained in support of the biogeography community by the social media and senior editors of the Journal of Biogeography

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/page/journal/13652699/homepage/editorialboard.html

Publish & Read

For information on publishing in Journal of Biogeography see https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/page/journal/13652699/homepage/forauthors.html

To browse recent articles, visit https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/13652699/0/0