Journal of Biogeography blog

The future of biogeography, now

The Journal of Biogeography publishes research at the intersection of biology and geography that is scientifically important and of broad general interest. We seek papers describing patterns and revealing mechanisms that shape biodiversity, through time, throughout the planet, from the deep past into the future, and from local to global scales.

Featured researchers

Meet researchers publishing in the journal, emphasizing early career researchers breaking new ground

View all posts in category … https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/category/featured-researchers/

… or read goals & how to contribute: https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/2019/12/24/introducing-featured-researchers/

Highlighted papers

Read about recent biogeography research published in the journal from a different perspective

View all posts in category … https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/category/highlighted-papers/

… or read goals & how to contribute: https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/2019/01/24/introducing-highlighted-papers/

Journal news

Updates from the senior editorial team on changes and initiatives at the Journal of Biogeography

View all posts in category … https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/category/journal-news/

… or read goals & how to contribute: https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/2019/12/24/introducing-journal-news/

Evolution of solitary bees suggests a biogeographic history connecting open habitats in South and North America

More than 1,000 species of eucerine bees exist mainly in savannas, deserts, and other open vegetation habitats on multiple continents, but they are uncommon near the equator and very high latitudes. The historical processes that generated this modern pattern for Eucerinae (and other taxa) are still surrounded by uncertainties. Above: Representatives of each one ofContinue reading “Evolution of solitary bees suggests a biogeographic history connecting open habitats in South and North America”

Diversity of the Deep

Previous work has characterized diversity gradients in terrestrial and shallow-water system. Are these previously described diversity gradients also applicable to hard-substrate features in the deep sea? Above: Some example seabed images from the cruises around St Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha (Credit: British Antarctic Survey/Centre for Environment, Fisheries and Aquaculture Science). Investigation into theContinue reading “Diversity of the Deep”

Flowers, biomes, and a mountain of data

Describing patterns of flowering time in plant communities across six biomes, and showing how they relate to climate means and climate predictability – all using open access data and a reproducible analysis in R. Above: Bossiaea foliosa (Leafy Bossiaea) flowering in the Snowy Mountains in southeast Australia. Alpine flowering is often highly concentrated, as everythingContinue reading “Flowers, biomes, and a mountain of data”

The Paleotropical Biome Rode the Ark of the Indian Plate from Africa to Asia

Tropical biomes today occupy a disjunct distribution around the equator covering about 7% of land surface, but harbouring more than 40% of plant species. This mystery is a fascinating topic yet to be fully addressed. We attempt to solve this mystery using our knowledge on the origin and migration of tropical gingers across these globalContinue reading “The Paleotropical Biome Rode the Ark of the Indian Plate from Africa to Asia”

ECR feature: Emily Schumacher on temporal climatic responses of the butternut tree

Emily Schumacher is a research assistant at the Morton Arboretum in the USA. She is a conservation biologist interested in using genetic tools to infer tree restoration measures. Here, Emily shares her recent work on temporal climatic effects on the butternuts. Emily Schumacher with butternut tree at the Morton Arboretum, Lisle, IL. Personal links. TwitterContinue reading “ECR feature: Emily Schumacher on temporal climatic responses of the butternut tree”

ECR Feature: Purabi Deshpande on habitat use by over-wintering birds

Purabi Deshpande is undertaking her PhD at the University of Helinksi. She is an urban ecologist, with an interest in understanding how climate change and anthropogenic disturbance affect bird communities. Purabi shares her recent work on the interaction between climate and habitat on over-wintering bird abundance in Finland. Purabi, watching early spring migrants in winterContinue reading “ECR Feature: Purabi Deshpande on habitat use by over-wintering birds”


Goals
  • To broaden the reach of biogeographical research
  • To enhance papers recently published in the journal
  • To communicate the journal’s choices to advance an equitable accessible quality publishing ecosystem for biogeography
Biogeography is …

“The branch of biology that deals with the geographical distribution of plants and animals. Also: the characteristics of an area or organism in this respect.”

Oxford English Dictionary

Values
About Us

This blog is maintained in support of the biogeography community by the social media and senior editors of the Journal of Biogeography

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/page/journal/13652699/homepage/editorialboard.html

Publish & Read

For information on publishing in Journal of Biogeography see https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/page/journal/13652699/homepage/forauthors.html

To browse recent articles, visit https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/13652699/0/0