Journal of Biogeography blog

The future of biogeography, now

The Journal of Biogeography publishes research at the intersection of biology and geography that is scientifically important and of broad general interest. We seek papers describing patterns and revealing mechanisms that shape biodiversity, through time, throughout the planet, from the deep past into the future, and from local to global scales.

Featured researchers

Meet researchers publishing in the journal, emphasizing early career researchers breaking new ground

View all posts in category … https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/category/featured-researchers/

… or read goals & how to contribute: https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/2019/12/24/introducing-featured-researchers/

Highlighted papers

Read about recent biogeography research published in the journal from a different perspective

View all posts in category … https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/category/highlighted-papers/

… or read goals & how to contribute: https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/2019/01/24/introducing-highlighted-papers/

Journal news

Updates from the senior editorial team on changes and initiatives at the Journal of Biogeography

View all posts in category … https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/category/journal-news/

… or read goals & how to contribute: https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/2019/12/24/introducing-journal-news/

ECR Feature: Shahan Derkarabetian on the biogeography of opilionoid arachnids

Shahan is a postdoc at the Museum of Comparative Zoology, Harvard University. He is a systematic and evolutionary biologist with a keen interest in Opiliones, an order of arachnids. Shahan shares his recent work on the opilionoid family, Triaenonychidae, investigating the role of geological events and past climate on their geographical distribution. Shahan Derkarabetian siftingContinue reading “ECR Feature: Shahan Derkarabetian on the biogeography of opilionoid arachnids”

ECR Feature: Jacob Suissa on the diversity of tropical montane ferns

Jacob Suissa is a PhD candidate at Harvard University. His major research interest is in the evolution of plants, particularly ferns. Jacob shares his recent work that has utilised vast herbarium records to understand global diversity in montane fern assemblages. Jacob in the Tepui’s in the Brazilian highlands. Links. Webpage | Instagram Institute. Harvard UniversityContinue reading “ECR Feature: Jacob Suissa on the diversity of tropical montane ferns”

ECR Feature: Thiago Laranjeiras on avian diversity in Amazonian floodplains

Thiago Laranjeiras is an an environmental analyst at Instituto Chico Mendes de Conservação da Biodiversidade. He is a biogeographer with a keen interest in the ecology and biodiversity of birds. Thiago shares his recent work on transitions in avifauna communities across floodplain habitats in the Amazon. Name. Thiago Orsi Laranjeiras Personal links. Web page |Continue reading “ECR Feature: Thiago Laranjeiras on avian diversity in Amazonian floodplains”

ECR feature: Andrea Paz on environmental predictors for Atlantic Forest diversity

Andrea Paz recent started her postdoc at ETH Zürich in Switzerland. She is an evolutionary biologist interested in unveiling the processes generating the patterns of species distributions. Here, Andrea shares her recent work investigating the environmental correlates of diversity for multiple clades and diversity measures in the Atlantic Forest. Andrea visiting the Atlantic Forest during aContinue reading “ECR feature: Andrea Paz on environmental predictors for Atlantic Forest diversity”

The elusiveness of biotic interactions in spatial data

Joint species distribution models may not yet be able to detect the signal of biotic interactions from empirical community data … due to the lack of sufficiently dense ecological datasets and fast-and-accurate algorithms. Above: Eurasian nuthatch (Sitta europaea) at its nesting site in a former woodpecker cavity.(Photo by Josefine S. / CC BY-NC-ND 2.0 /Continue reading “The elusiveness of biotic interactions in spatial data”

History and genetic diversity of the most common Antarctic Lichens

Antarctic lichens with different population history show grossly diverging genetic patterns. Above: Antarctic lichens (Usnea) near Carlini station on King George Island, January 2016 (Elisa Lagostina). The Antarctic is arguably the most remote place on Earth and difficult to reach for scientists and other organisms. In many people’s imagination it may just be a vast ice domeContinue reading “History and genetic diversity of the most common Antarctic Lichens”


Goals
  • To broaden the reach of biogeographical research
  • To enhance papers recently published in the journal
  • To communicate the journal’s choices to advance an equitable accessible quality publishing ecosystem for biogeography
Biogeography is …

“The branch of biology that deals with the geographical distribution of plants and animals. Also: the characteristics of an area or organism in this respect.”

Oxford English Dictionary

Values
About Us

This blog is maintained in support of the biogeography community by the social media and senior editors of the Journal of Biogeography

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/page/journal/13652699/homepage/editorialboard.html

Publish & Read

For information on publishing in Journal of Biogeography see https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/page/journal/13652699/homepage/forauthors.html

To browse recent articles, visit https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/13652699/0/0