Journal of Biogeography blog

The future of biogeography, now

The Journal of Biogeography publishes research at the intersection of biology and geography that is scientifically important and of broad general interest. We seek papers describing patterns and revealing mechanisms that shape biodiversity, through time, throughout the planet, from the deep past into the future, and from local to global scales.

Featured researchers

Meet researchers publishing in the journal, emphasizing early career researchers breaking new ground

View all posts in category … https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/category/featured-researchers/

… or read goals & how to contribute: https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/2019/12/24/introducing-featured-researchers/

Highlighted papers

Read about recent biogeography research published in the journal from a different perspective

View all posts in category … https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/category/highlighted-papers/

… or read goals & how to contribute: https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/2019/01/24/introducing-highlighted-papers/

Journal news

Updates from the senior editorial team on changes and initiatives at the Journal of Biogeography

View all posts in category … https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/category/journal-news/

… or read goals & how to contribute: https://journalofbiogeographynews.org/2019/12/24/introducing-journal-news/

New insights into the history of Central European steppe grasslands

Spatial patterns of species and haplotypes suggest long-term continuity of steppes in eastern Central Europe. Above: A species-rich meadow steppe near Cristuru Secuiesc (Hungarian: Székelykeresztúr), Harghita County, Transylvania, Romania. Photographed on 29 May 2017 by Wolfgang Willner.. The steppe grasslands of eastern Central Europe have attracted botanists and vegetation scientists for more than two centuries.Continue reading “New insights into the history of Central European steppe grasslands”

Functional redundancy increases in human-modified habitats

Different species do similar things in anthropic environments. Above: Two examples of small mammals with very distinct biologies. The Brazilian gracile opossum Gracilinanus microtarsus (left) is a generalist that forages in the ground and inhabits a broad range of habitat types — from primary to secondary forests and forest edges. Such generalists usually profit fromContinue reading “Functional redundancy increases in human-modified habitats”

Introducing the Members of the New (2nd) Editorial Academy

The Editorial Academy at Journal of Biogeography aims to help early career biogeographers learn more about publishing with the guidance and support of an experienced mentor. Each of the Editorial Academy members is partnered one-to-one with one of the journal’s chief or associate editors with relevant disciplinary expertise. The academy members have the same roleContinue reading “Introducing the Members of the New (2nd) Editorial Academy”

ECR feature: Adriana Uscanga on the origins of tropical sky-islands arthropod communities

Adriana Uscanga is a PhD candidate at the University of Oregon in the US. She is an ecologist interested in unveiling the evolutionary drivers shaping biodiversity distribution in tropical mountains. Here, Adriana shares her recent work on evaluating colonization routes of newly emerged high-elevation habitats. Adriana Uscanga is a PhD candidate at the University ofContinue reading “ECR feature: Adriana Uscanga on the origins of tropical sky-islands arthropod communities”

Call for papers: Emerging Techniques and the Future of Biogeography

Biogeography advances when new concepts, methodologies and tools allow us to see the world in different ways: plate tectonics reshaped the study of distributions, deep sea submersibles revealed life at hydrothermal vents, phylogeography was born through advances in sequencing, and macroecology originated in a novel top-down statistical view, to name but a few. We areContinue reading “Call for papers: Emerging Techniques and the Future of Biogeography”

Life-form diversity across temperate deciduous forests of Western Eurasia: A different story in the understory

Deconstructing the forest community into three structural components — tree, shrub, ground floor – reveals different origins. Above: Forest in the lowlands of Asturias, Spain (August 2021 by Javier Loidi). Forests have always had a special appeal to ecologists, as they represent the most complex and developed type of terrestrial ecosystem. They are composed ofContinue reading “Life-form diversity across temperate deciduous forests of Western Eurasia: A different story in the understory”


Goals
  • To broaden the reach of biogeographical research
  • To enhance papers recently published in the journal
  • To communicate the journal’s choices to advance an equitable accessible quality publishing ecosystem for biogeography
Biogeography is …

“The branch of biology that deals with the geographical distribution of plants and animals. Also: the characteristics of an area or organism in this respect.”

Oxford English Dictionary

Values
About Us

This blog is maintained in support of the biogeography community by the social media and senior editors of the Journal of Biogeography

https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/page/journal/13652699/homepage/editorialboard.html

Publish & Read

For information on publishing in Journal of Biogeography see https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/page/journal/13652699/homepage/forauthors.html

To browse recent articles, visit https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/toc/13652699/0/0